What you can do with leftover wine

What you can do with leftover wine
Highlights

What You Can Do With Leftover Wine. Certain serious questions which confront wine connoisseurs regularly are, “How can I keep half a bottle of wine from going bad? How long will wine last after opening? On the counter or in the fridge? Corked or re-bottled?”

Certain serious questions which confront wine connoisseurs regularly are, “How can I keep half a bottle of wine from going bad? How long will wine last after opening? On the counter or in the fridge? Corked or re-bottled?”

The answer is easy — keep leftover wine away from air — but the ways to do that are many, some more effective than others. Leftover wine does not need go down the drain; it can be re-purposed for sheer culinary delight.

To stave off spoilage in a bottle of wine that's been opened, the most important goal is to give any leftover wine a wide berth from oxygen. The amount of wine doesn't matter; once the cork is pulled or the screw cap twisted off, all the wine in a bottle is laid siege by oxygen.

As it oxidises, wine loses its fruit aromas and flavours, turns darker or browner in hue and, eventually, tastes pretty awful.

Storing wine in the refrigerator slows oxidation, but it does not prevent it. You can chart deterioration in that half bottle of wine from day one. Re-cork the open bottle of wine and refrigerate it—even if it’s red. The cold temperature will slow the oxidation process that alters its taste, keeping it drinkable for the next few days.

“Oxygen and wine have a testy relationship best kept brief. Wine starts to oxidise as soon as you open it," warns Sheshagiri of Premier Beverages.

Oxygen does seep slowly through barrels and corks into wine over years. Many wines benefit from aeration after opening, decanting and swirling in a glass.

Sadly, the solution often hangs on "depends." How long a winewill last depends on what kind: red or white, sweet or dry, made to age or ready for drinking says Nawab Shafat a connoisseur of good wines.

Tripti Mishra, who was once into training to make wines, says, “If it is about homemade wines, pour your leftover wine into a covered container (it should not be airtight) and set it in a cool, dark location to allow it to ferment. The solution will start off murky, but you'll see it clarify with time. Once you see a white skin at the bottom, a bacterial culture known as the ‘mother’, the homemade vinegar is ready to incorporate into your favorite recipes.”

“If you've opened up a bottle for a glass or two but have a decent amount left over, employ your wine for a sweet treat: boozy syrup. Combine the bottle of wine with a cup of sugar. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat, allowing it to simmer for 35 to 45 minutes. Let it cool for a few minutes on the stove top, then refrigerate it until it thickens up. Top it over ice cream, waffles or fresh fruit for a special treat,” explains Tripti.

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