Godavari fails to break the Army barrier

Godavari fails to break the Army barrier
Highlights

The Godavari drinking water project at an estimated cost of Rs 3,725 crore is as good as completed bar a 2.2 km stretch of land where pipelines have to be laid. It is this stretch between Kowkoor village and CRPF firing range that has become the bone of contention between officials of Hyderabad Metropolitan Water Supply

Pipelines are yet to be laid between Kowkoor and CRPF which will ensure the completion of the project as the Army is yet to grant permission for the works

The Godavari drinking water project at an estimated cost of Rs 3,725 crore is as good as completed bar a 2.2 km stretch of land where pipelines have to be laid. It is this stretch between Kowkoor village and CRPF firing range that has become the bone of contention between officials of Hyderabad Metropolitan Water Supply and Sewerage Board (HMWS&SB) and Army under whose jurisdiction the piece of land is.


Despite the two-year old thorny issue remaining unresolved, the Water Board officials remain hopeful of getting the Army go-ahead to lay the pipe. The project aims to supply 172 million gallons of water per day by bringing 10 TMC water from Yellampally Barrage in Karimnagar to Ghanpur covering a distance of 186kms.

Barring the 2.2 km stretch at Kowkoor, pipelines have been laid from Karimnagar to the city

The board’s managing director M Jagadeeshwar said, “We have been holding a dialogue with the defence authorities but to no avail. Many written representations have also not shown any positive impact.” Today, they see a ray of hope in the New Delhi visit undertaken by Chief Minister K Chandrasekhar Rao and his Thursday’s interaction with Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar.


A senior official of Water Board said that 90 per cent of work is complete but the project hangs in balance for want of just 1.2 acres of land. “The land would be used only to lay underground pipelines and the board is ready to pay the rental charges. We are yet to get any viable reasons for the delay.” Malika, a resident of Kowkoor, points out that even the Army stands to gain once the Godavari water reaches the city.


People living in Qutbullabur, Alwal and Malkajgiri would be major beneficiaries of the Godavari water.M Jagadeeshwar said that if there is no rainfall, Singur would go dry in June and it would have an adverse effect. “Hope wisdom prevails on the authorities and a decision is taken soon. This will resolve the problems once and for all.”

By:T P Venu

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