Parental violence affects girls, boys differently

Parental violence affects girls, boys differently
Highlights

Exposure to violent activities such as pushing, choking, slapping or threatening with a gun or knife by parents or a parent\'s intimate partner can affect girls and boys differently, says a new research

Exposure to violent activities such as pushing, choking, slapping or threatening with a gun or knife by parents or a parent's intimate partner can affect girls and boys differently, says a new research.

"While girls tend to internalise their exposure to such violence, boys are more inclined to act out aggressively," said the study's lead investigator Megan Holmes, assistant professor at the Case Western Reserve University in the US.
The study that involved 1,125 children also analysed responses from their mothers, who were interviewed about their child's aggressive behaviour and social skills in areas such as assertiveness, cooperation, responsibility and self-control.
Among the children, 14 percent exhibited aggressive behaviour and 46 percent displayed fewer social skills than their peers during pre-school.
During kindergarten years, aggression increased to 18 percent, and 34 percent still showed fewer social skills.
Differences in how boys and girls reacted to viewing violent episodes also emerged.
"The exposure occurring when the child was of school age predicted poor social skills for girls but not for boys," Holmes said.
The findings suggest school-age (kindergarten) girls are more likely to struggle with the social skills needed to interact with others and succeed in school.
Meanwhile, boys were more likely to display aggressive behaviour starting in pre-school as a result of their exposure to the violence.
"This aggression tends to isolate them and prevent healthy interactions with other children," Holmes added.
The study appeared in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence.
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